Mapping Dubai

Posted on April 15, 2010

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First in a series of posts on visualization and information mapping.

These are a series of research based maps created in 2008 on the (un)sustainable practices in Dubai.

The first map is called ‘Population Growth: Stratified Diversity’. It tries to capture 3 things: Dubai’s growth timeline with major events, growth in population and the diversity of the population.  Only 12% of Dubai’s population are natives and 50% are South Asians who come to Dubai seeking jobs.

The first map is called 'Population Growth: Stratified Diversity'. It tries to capture 3 things: Dubai's growth timeline with major events, growth in population and the diversity of the population.  Only 12% of Dubai's population are natives and 50% are South Asians who come to Dubai seeking jobs

Here is a zoom in on the icons:

The second map is related to the construction boom in Dubai that caused it to expand in all directions. It is titled ‘Expanding Boundaries’ . This map shows the lateral, vertical and prosthetic expansion over time.

Map 3 ‘Scra(m)bbled Growth‘ addresses growth from the ’cause and effect’ perspective. It is one of my favorites. Though I love the idea, I feel I could do a better job with the choice of fonts and kerning. It is on my to-do list and will post a revised version when I get it done.

Map 4 ‘Dredging: Abusing the Environment?’ addresses the topic of dredging. A tetris inspired map that shows the effects of creating artificial islands like the World islands and the Palms. With 185 million tons of sand and 7 million tons of rock dumped into the water to build the Palm Jumeirah, 13 million sq. feet of coral was killed, many fish and smaller organisms were either displaced or killed.

Map 5 is titled ‘Quenching the Green Desert Thirst’ . As is evident from the title, the map shows Dubai’s water consumption. A 62% increase in desalinized water consumption was seen in 4 years from 2002 -06.  By 2020, 70% of Dubai’s water consumption will be from desalinized water, of which 85% is used for irrigation and greening.

The last map titled ‘ Growing cities, Growing problems’ compares Dubai and Las Vegas to Pearl River Delta (PRD) in China. Though at first it may seem like an unfair comparison, considering PRD is a region and not a city, it is quickly evident that Dubai’s water and ecological footprint is almost 80% of PRD’s while it is 1/8th the size of PRD.

More here: http://www.cmu.edu/architecture/academics/courses/mappingurbanism/Dubai/student-work.html

© Pallavi Mantha, 2008

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